History

History

Originally, Aquidneck Island was home to the Narragansett Indian tribe who called the land the “Isle of Peace.” It was purchased from the tribe in 1638 and inhabited by the nation’s first English settlers who, after fleeing from persecution, secured religious tolerance in what is now the city of Portsmouth by collectively signing a contract guaranteeing their freedom.

In 1647, it was the site of the first assembly for the Colony, then consisting of the towns of Portsmouth, Newport, Providence, and Warwick. Stone walls on the Club’s property designate the boundaries of the original colonial land grants.

The island remained an idyllic center for agriculture, shipping and commerce until the colonial revolution, when it was occupied primarily by British forces.

History

In the late 1770s, American troops were advancing on the English-controlled island. The famous Battle of Rhode Island was fought on what are now the 7th, 8th, and 9th Holes in August 29, 1778. Historical markers can be seen throughout the course.